Malaga

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Malaga is a large city in the southern Spanish region of Andalucia and capital of the Malaga Province. The largest city on the Costa del Sol, Malaga has a typical Mediterranean climate and is also known as the birthplace of famous Spanish artist Pablo Picasso. The city offers beaches, hiking, architectural sites, art museums, excellent shopping and cuisine.

Malaga, Spain
Malaga, Spain

While more laid back than Madrid or Barcelona, Malaga is still the center and transport hub for the hugely popular Costa del Sol region, which is flooded with tourists in the summer, and the city has certainly cashed in on the sun and sand, with lots of new construction as well as hotels and facilities geared to tourists. However, Malaga also offers some genuinely interesting historical and cultural attractions in its old city and its setting on the coast is still beautiful.

Malaga, Spain

The old historic centre of Malaga reaches the harbour to the south and is surrounded by mountains to the north, the Montes de Malaga (part of Baetic Cordillera), lying in the southern base of the Axarquia hills, and two rivers, the Guadalmedina C the historic center is located on its left bank - and the Guadalhorce, which flows west of the city into the Mediterranean.

Malaga, Spain
Malaga, Spain

The oldest architectural remains in the city are the walls of the Phoenician city, which are visible in the cellar of the Museo Picasso Malaga.The Roman theatre of Malaga, which dates from the 1st century BC, was rediscovered in 1951.

Malaga, Spain

The Moors left posterity the dominating presence of the Castle of Gibralfaro, which is connected to the Alcazaba, the lower fortress and royal residence. Both were built during the Taifa period and extended during the Nasrid period. The Alcazaba stands on a hill within the city. Originally, it defended the city from the incursions of pirates. Later, in the 11th century, it was completely rebuilt by the Hammudid dynasty.

Malaga, Spain
Malaga, Spain

Like many of the military fortifications that were constructed in Islamic Spain, the Alcazaba of Malaga featured a quadrangular plan. It was protected by an outer and inner wall, both supported by rectangular towers, between which a covered walkway led up the slope to the Gibralfaro.

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