Princess Bay Wellington

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Princess Bay is one of the southern beaches of Wellington, New Zealand. It is situated between Houghton Bay and Te Raekaihau Point, on the rocky shores of the Cook Strait. It comprises a beach that skirts Houghton Bay and contains a regular population of surfers and divers.

Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand
Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand

Princess Bay is on the Southern Headlands Reserve, and along with other parts of Wellington's South Coast, it is a popular recreational diving and fishing spot. In 2005 the decommissioned F69 Frigate Wellington was sunk off Houghton Bay, and is now an artificial reef and dive location. Princess Bay has a long history as a favourite surf spot of locals, and is an even smaller sister to neighbours Houghton and Lyall Bays.

Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand
Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand

Princess Bay has a sheltered sandy beach and is a popular place to swim in summer. Tucked between Houghton Bay's headland and Te Raekaihau Point, it has good views of Taputeranga Island. On a clear day you can see the peaks of the Kaikoura Range in the South Island. The bay is part of the Taputeranga Marine Reserve, which aims to return the marine habitats to a more natural state and increase the size and abundance of fish.

Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand
Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand

Wellington, on New Zealand's North Island, contains a vast array of beaches, with regular buses linking the city centre with many of the city's most stunning secluded bays and top surfing locations. The neighbouring township of Plimmerton is home to one of the region's most appealing beaches, with this area originally being settled by the Maoris.

Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand
Karori Wildlife Sanctuary, New Zealand

Beaches around Wellington are used for a wide range of related activities, such as sunbathing, tramping, scuba diving, snorkelling, swimming and surfing, all of which have become major pastimes here. When swimming, it is always important to only swim between any lifeguard flags present, in case of strong waves and unpredictable rip tides.

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